Our Optical Illusions' journey takes an interesting turn...

During our exploration of Optical Illusions we discovered how careful use of the colour wheel makes our illusions even more 3D and we stumbled again upon Russian artist Kandinsky.

We had tripped over him once before when we were investigating circles.

This time we were interested to see how Kandinsky used different colour combinations in his circles and which combinations 'popped out' out more than others.

Kandinsky was a Russian artist who had an interesting brain! It enabled him to see music. When he heard a note he saw a colour. How then did his painting sound?

We decided to explore...

Squares with concentric circle, 1913

Squares with Concentric Circles, 1913

The painting by Kandinsky...

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We tore and assembled our own Kandinsky-style circles...

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... colour-coded the piano keys with bits of coloured paper (in no

particular order) ...

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...and played our composition, one square (and four notes) at a

time. It was tricky playing four notes with our small hands...

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... maybe it would be easier if we had fewer colours ...

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... maybe it would sound better if the colours were in a different order....

The music was interesting and rather spooky. Some combinations were quite unmusical to our ears, others sounded pleasing. The music had a different atmosphere if we played the colours backwards or inside out...

Hmmm... If each student made a square using colour combinations they liked (depending on their mood), we could put them all together in a music score, Sounds and Colours of Room 9.

Meanwhile we discovered Scriabin...

Alexandr Scriabin (1872-1915) was a Russian musician who used colours to compose music.

Some people think that Scriabin, like Kandinsky, had a brain which could 'see' music in colour. Others think he used musical theory to arrange his colours.

Scrabin used fewer colours than we did and, since he was a musician, maybe his order of colours on the piano keys may make our music sound more harmonious?

scriabin head
Source: kids.britannica.com

Alexandr Scriabin(1872-1915)

scriabin code.jpg
Source: commons.wikimedia.org
Scriabin's colour-code for the piano keys

See Scriabin's music ...

Coming soon...

Scriabin and Kandinsky meet Room 9