Drip Rifles - The Ghost Guns of Gallipoli

Mapping Gallipoli

Make a Red Poppy...

... and remember the 100th Anniversary of the 1915 Gallipoli Campaign. In the Allen Centre we are making and mounting 241 poppies to remember the Dunedin ANZACs who died at Gallipoli.



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1. Cut out 5 poppy petals. Draw them or print them

from the template (above).

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2. Punch a hole in the pointed end of each petal.

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3. Cut out a small black circle for the poppy's centre.

Poke a paper fastener through the centre.

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4. Tightly scrunch each petal.

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5. Open the petals. They now have the delicate look

of real poppies.

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6. Poke the paper fastener with its black circle through

the holes in the petals.

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7. Turn over the poppy, spread out the paper fastener,

and hook a loop of florist's wire around the back.

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8. Cut out a poppy leaf. Draw it or print it from the

template (above). Done! 240 to go....

Follow our poppy-making...

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All About the First World War


Anzac Cove: ENEMY: The TERRAIN

"Instead of the sandbanks and gentle slopes the ANZACs were expecting they found cliffs and very steep hills, with the Turks at the top." Read more

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"Anzac, the landing 1915" by George Washington Lambert

THE CHALLENGE is to make a model of Anzac Cove illustrating the extremely difficult terrain the ANZAC's had to deal with during the Gallipoli Campaign.

To do this you will need to do some research. Google historical and present day photographs, videos, topographic maps and written descriptions. You will discover that by mistake the ANZACs landed in the worst possible spot.

At Anzac Cove the beach is backed by a rocky, prickly, scrub-covered area with little water. The limestone hills are steep-sided, cut by erosion into knife-edged, deep gulleys and ravines.

Among the hills which lie along the spine of the Peninsula, there are many peaks, ridges and valleys. The Turks positioned themselves in trenches on the ridges which put the ANZACs at a desperate disadvantage.

How to build your diorama:

Using the technique below, your model can be as detailed or as rough as your age, ability, interest and patience permits. If you prefer you can build the model's skeleton using chicken wire or cardboard.

This method uses scrunched up newspaper and masking tape instead.

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1. You will need flour and water to make the papier

mache, newspaper, tin foil, masking tape and a board

to display your diorama.

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2. To make the papier mache glue, mix equal parts

of plain flour and water. 1/2 cup of each is a useful

amount for a lunchtime building session.

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3. Scrumple some newspaper into the shape you are

after. The shape above could be the low rise on the

beach which gave the ANZACs cover when they landed.

Use the masking tape to hold it in place.

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4. Tear some newspaper into narrow strips.

Don't use scissors - torn edges blend into the model

better than cut edges.

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5. Stroke your paper across the glue to coat the back.

You don't need to coat the front as well.

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6. Add your strip to the paper ridge and smooth it on

in such a way it forms the natural dips and rises in

the land.

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7. Add some flat strips below the rise to form the beach.

Forming small crinkles suggests the natural patterns in

the sand.

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7. The tin foil is useful for modelling the sharply

eroded limestone ridges which can them be covered

with papier mache strips.

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8. Here, the ridges have been taped to stand behind

the rise at the back of the beach...

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9... and covered with newspaper strips to blend in

with the beach.

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10. A hair dryer speeds up the process of drying the glue.

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11. Plain paper has been added to outline the beach.

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12. The newspaper has been covered with strips of

rock-coloured brown paper strips.

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13. Features are added using PVA glue. Several

sizes of sand reflect the rocky beach.

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14. Dab the PVA quite thickly and sprinkle on the sand.

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15. Shake off the loose sand.

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16. Sand has been added to make stoney platforms.

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17. Lichens suggest the areas of thick, low, tangled

shrubs which hid Turkish snipers as well as ANZACs.

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18. The limestone ridges and cliffs remain exposed.

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19. Coils of barbed wire have been added along ridges.

Maybe add trenches and the ANZACs' equipment

on the beach...


ANZAC Day Customs

anzac poppy wreath
Laying of Wreaths

Anzac Ode
The Ode

anzac last post
The Last Post

anzac silence
A Minute's Silence

Anzac rouse2
The Rouse

anzac poppy
Poppies

anzac reversed arms
Reversed Arms

anzac unknown soldier
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

anzac rosemary
Rosemary

Anzac NZ flag
Flags at Half Mast

Anzac gun salutes
Gun Salutes

Anzac gallipoli medal2
Gallipoli Medal

The Last Post

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Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Post

The Rouse

Anzac rouse