Ikebana is the art of arranging flowers. In Japanese "ike" means to arrange and "bana" comes from the word "hana" meaning flower.
In Ikebana the flowers and branches are arranged so that they appear in a beautiful, simple, and natural way.
In this session Motoko-san showed us how to do an ikebana arrangement.

There are some special rules relating to heights and angles of each stem. (Interested? - scroll down to the links at the bottom of the page.)

But Motoko-san said that the way to make a beautiful arrangement is by using your eyes and heart.

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Source:3businessideas.blogspot.co.nz
ikebana4.jpg
Source:www.flickr.com
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Source:flower-arrangement-ideas.com
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Source: www.thegardener.btinternet.co.uk
water kanji.jpg

mizu - water

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tsuchi - earth

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ame - heaven

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hana - flower

There were so many beautiful flowers, leafy branches and twigs on the floor, but Motoko-san chose only three.

We watched her quietly thinking and imagining as she made her choice.... we wondered if she would choose three of the most colourful flowers....

but instead she chose a twig of pale pink cherry blossom and two smaller leafy branches of different shapes and shades .... the cherry blossoms looked very delicate against the green.... each stem had to be trimmed to a different length. We watched as Motoko-san thoughtfully placed her stems in a beautiful arrangement. Afterwards we chose stems to make our own Ikebana arrangements and practised some Ikebana kanji...

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The Special Rules:

Angles to print and cut out:


Ikebana Kanji


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