In this session, we blew beautiful trees into existence using ink and a straw and decorated them with tissue paper blossoms to suggest Spring.

We wrote haiku poems to accompany our paintings. We tried to capture the feel and mood of spring.

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Hundreds of years ago...

...the Japanese created an art form - in the shape of a small verse. They called it Haiku.

Here are some examples...

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This snowy morning

That black crow I hate so much...

But he's beautiful,

-by Basho


The wintry wind blows

The blueness of its sharp breath

Chilling the Earth's bones.

- by Basho


With plum blossom scent,

this sudden sun emerges

along a mountain trail

-Basho


Overhanging pine...

adding its mite of needles

to the waterfall

- Basho

Haiku grew from an early writing game in which the first 3 lines of a poem were written by one person. A second person wrote the closing 2 lines.

The great Japanese writer Matsuo Basho grew tired on this game. He felt that the first 3 lines could stand alone - and Haiku was born.

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The great Japanese writer, Basho (1644-94) by Hokusai.

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Haiku Poems....

.

Haiku poems only have 3 lines and no more than

17 syllables. They never rhyme.

The first line usually has 5 syllables

The second line has 7 syllables.

The third line has 5 syllables.

The poems express a thought, a feeling or a mood.


Here's an example...

.

Pa....tient....li....ttle....snail

1.........2........3......4..........5

Slides...a....cross...the...morn....ing....grass

1............2........3........4.........5.........6..........7

in..... the.....zen....gard...en

1........2...........3........4........5


Some of Basho's poems have different numbers of syllables.

Click here to read Basho's poems.

We also practised our calligraphy with kanji for the seasons....

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Haru - Spring

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Natsu - Summer

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Aki - Autumn

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Fuyu - Winter

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summer kanji steps.jpg
haiku autumn steps.jpg
winter kanji steps.jpg

Source:http://japanese.about.com

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Our trees gave us inspiration to write a haiku for Motoko-san to thank her for her wonderful Ikebana session last week.

Instead of counting syllables, which we found a little tricky, some of us counted words - 3 words for the first line, 4 words for the second line and 3 again for the third line.

Others of us decided just to choose words which we felt captured the feel of Spring. Our trees reminded us a little of ikebana....

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Now we have to assemble our work into a beautiful book to give to Motoko-san next week...

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